social delta

Consulting and support for social enterprise in Canada

Category: Great Resource

Community Impact Bond: invest in social innovation through HUB Ottawa

Impact Hub Ottawa has been in existence for more than five years providing space, resources, information and a network to many of Ottawa’s most progressive citizens and organizations. They have recently moved to a new location as they continue to grow.

The staff and board of HUB Ottawa are hosting a mix and mingle event in which they will share their growth plans, launch their new Community Impact Bond opportunity and answer any questions you may have about this new investment vehicle.  If you are interested in investing in the changemakers, innovators, and social entrepreneurs making our city a better place to live, you’ll want to attend their information session.

Monday May 8th, 5:30-7pm at 123 Slater, 6th floor

This community bond offers a fixed rate of return based upon either a 2 or 5 year term. You can download a more complete prospectus at the HUB Community Bond Offer.  For more information, you may always connect with Katie Miller, HUB Ottawa’s Managing Director to discuss the opportunity further. Her full contact details are in the prospectus. I also recommend that you visit the HUB website to learn more about the programs and services offered by HUB Ottawa.

It is exciting to see Ottawa  offer social investors an opportunity to participate in creating a more vibrant, just, and healthy city;  I encourage you to find out more.

2016 Gift Guide featuring social enterprises and progressive businesses

Social Delta is pleased to recommend the holiday gift guide that has been produced by Social Enterprise Ontario. Please consider supporting these businesses, as you share holiday cheer with friends, family and colleagues.

Each gift you buy this holiday season can have significant impact on your community. Thanks to the newly launched Social Enterprise Gift Guide, extending the impact of your gift giving is now easier than ever. The Guide features a wide variety of products created by Canada’s diverse social enterprise sector, representing for-profit and non-profit organizations, cooperatives and B Corps.

The Social Enterprise Gift Guide includes a broad range of products and is fully searchable by product type, price range, region and other categories. For example, you’ll be able to purchase calendars or greeting cards from Options Mississauga Print and Office Services, beer from Beau’s All Natural Brewing Company, meals cooked by Syrian refugees from Newcomer Kitchen, Inc. and order a gift basket of local preserves made by Youth Opportunities Unlimited in London.

In addition to the main online guide there is a printable Feature Product Gift Guide (PDF) with selected products from different social enterprises from across the province

The Guide is available in English and French (ESontario.org).

This project was made possible thanks to a collaboration of various community organizations and the financial support of the Government of Ontario.

You can find the full catalogue of 100+ products and services online at http://seontario.org/social-enterprise-gift-guide-2016.

If you’re a social enterprise and you’d like to showcase your products & services please fill out this form. (Deadline: December 9)

Funding–yes grant money–to reduce homelessness

Employment And Social Development of the Government of Canada recently launched two calls for proposals for innovative projects that aim to prevent and reduce homelessness. This is an excellent opportunity for social entrepreneurs with a social mission related to homelessness.

Below is a message they have sent out to be shared:

The call for proposals for microgrants has been extended and will end on November 14, 2016.

  • The call for proposals for microgrants – Apply for funding up to $25,000 for small-scale projects. Projects must focus on exploring effective and innovative practices, tools or initiatives that prevent or reduce homelessness in Canada.

Note that there is also a more comprehensive funding program for larger scale initiatives, also with a deadline of November 14, 2016. For more information, please visit the Innovative Solutions to Homelessness funding page.

Join the Social Enterprise Council of Canada

As of April 2015, the Social Enterprise Council of Canada (SECC) has opened up its membership to social enterprises and any and all who support social enterprise across the country.  By working together, we all have a greater voice to promote change. Become a member now and raise your voice to support the sector.

The SECC is the only national organization that works to promote social enterprise policy and best practice. Based upon the following six pillars required to support the sector, the SECC has for almost a decade worked with governments, social enterprise supports, community partners, funders and financiers to help build a positive environment for social enterprise to start and flourish in Canada.  These pillars have been used by public policy makers in BC, Nova Scotia,  Ontario,  Manitoba and in federal government departments.

The Six Pillars:

  1. Enhance Business Skills
  2. Ensure Access To Capital
  3. Create Market Opportunities
  4. Recognize Impact
  5. Provide Supportive Legislation And Regulations
  6. Connect practitioners in a strong national network

Annual memberships are inexpensive, and with greater membership, the Council has greater voice in representing those who are using business tools and earned income to create  more just, sustainable, resilient and robust communities across the country.

Join today at www.secouncil.ca.  Become part of the conversation that will chart the future of social enterprise in Canada.

Members are eligible to stand for and vote for SECC Directors–who are unpaid for their work to build the sector– and all members are invited to participate in the discussion on how best to support  social enterprises in the country.

One of the key public activities of the SECC is to work with a local partner to present a national conference every 18 months to showcase success, share best practices, build capacity and develop policy recommendations. Past conferences have been held in Vancouver, Toronto, Halifax, Calgary, and most recently in London (Ontario). The next national conference is planned for the Fall of 2016.

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Make it easy for gift buyers to find your social enterprise

SEontario  invites any Ontario based Social Enterprise [SE] to tell them about their products and/or services available this holiday season.

All through the month of December the good folks at Social Enterprise Ontario will be updating their Social Enterprise Holiday Gifts page, tweeting, and sharing via their news section different offerings from great Ontario SE’s like yours.

Please fill out this online form  to let them know a little about your social enterprise and the products/services that you’d like highlighted.

They officially launched the page on Monday, Dec. 1st, 2014.

Get your products and/or services listed on this gift giving directory as soon as possible, as the page will be updated and maintained all through the Holiday season.

If you are looking to buy gifts from social enterprises…be sure to follow @seontarioweb on Twitter, and visit the Social Enterprise Holiday Gifts page for gift ideas.

Federal Government supports for Social Enterprise

The Canadian Business Network (CBN), created and maintained by the Canadian Federal Government, offers a wide array of support to start-up businesses.

Recognizing the unique needs of social enterprise, they have created a dedicated portal for entrepreneurs using  businesses to address a social need.  This social enterprise portal offers links to resources available across Canada  from community based support organizations and from various levels of government.  The links and resources include technical support on everything from how to do market research or write a business plan,  to funding support for start-up costs or human resource needs.

The Federal Government, in trying to make the CBN accessible to non-profits, co-operatives and solo social entrepreneurs, sought the input from many of us in the social enterprise community. This portal is a concrete step to acknowledge social enterprise and to ensure that programs run by the government (and others) are available for those of us wishing to use business to bring about social change.

Social Delta is of course willing to help you and your social enterprise understand, access and apply any of the resources  made available on the CBN site.

Just contact us to see how we can help.

 

Free downloadable resources now available

Social Delta has just made several resources available to be downloaded for free.

Do you know your entrepreneurial strengths and weaknesses? What sort of incorporation is right for your social business? What information might be included in a social enterprise business plan?

Visit our Downloadable Resources page to answer these questions and more.

Can Non Profits intentionally make profits?

Non profit organizations do not have the benefit of issuing tax receipts for donations, unless they are registered charities. This means that non profits running a social enterprise are at a significant disadvantage if they are trying to access funding from donors, philanthropists, foundations and many government programs. For many (non-charity) NPO’s, earned revenue is almost a necessity in order to fund their social, cultural, environmental or recreational programs.

The question is  whether a non profit organization can run their business so as to intentionally make a profit?

The answer up until now has been a resounding no. Many non profits believe that so long as they re-invest any profits (that is to say the excess of revenue over expenses) in the social mission, then they are OK. However, the CRA does not believe that this so-called “destination of profits test” is a sufficient argument. Indeed, the Canada Revenue Agency in their February 2014 Non-Profit Organization Risk Identification Project Report states: “It is the CRA’s position that a NPO can earn profits, but the profits should be incidental and arise from activities that are undertaken to meet the organization’s non-profit objectives. The earning of profit cannot be or become a purpose of the organization, even if the profit is earned to fund non-profit objectives.”

To paraphrase: if a non profit organization intentionally makes a profit year over year, even if that profit is reinvested in the organization’s mission,  they run the risk of losing their tax exemption.

Social Delta recommends the research work of the BC Centre for Social Enterprise, as they’ve written several position papers on this policy issue and others relevant to social enterprise operations run by non profits.

 

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